Emperor of Thorns

eotTitle: Emperor of Thorns

Author: Mark Lawrence

Summary: The path to the thrown is broken – only the broken can walk it.

The world is cracked and time has run through, leaving us clutching at the end of days. These are my days. I will stand before the Hundred and they will listen. I will take the throne no matter who stands against me, living or dead.

This is where the wise turn away. This is where the holy kneel and call on God. Don’t look to me to save you, Turn if you have the wit. Pray if you have the soul. Stand your ground if courage is yours. But don’t follow me.

Follow me, and I will break your heart.

Rating: ★★★☆☆ 3.5/5

Review: The third and final book in the Broken Empire series. I’m sad to let Jorg go, but am pleased there are more books by Lawrence set in this fascinating post-apocalyptic universe. I already have the next one on my wishlist.

Emperor holds all the smooth, witty writing of the previous books. So much so I took to this books with a pen like no other yet, stopping every few pages to underline a line or a mark a passage. I cannot express enough how much a love the writing style. It’s subtle, and if you’re not paying attention you might slip past its humour and its poignancy (sometimes in the same line). Above the dystopian post-apocalyptic setting, beyond the characters, it is the writing itself that kept me reading.

Talking of characters though, okay, I have things to say. There was no one i hated, which, when almost all the characters are some shade of evil, might be a strange thing to say, but it’s no surprise, either. Excepting Jorg (the book is told in first person from his point of view, you’ve got to like him), my favourite character was Miana. However. I don’t think enough was made of her. She was introduced in the previous book and though her appearance was brief, she made one hell of an impact (quite literally). I finished King entirely enamoured with her, hoping she would be in Emperor. And, while she retained her strength of character she was very much “Jorg’s wife” and never really came into her own.

What other female characters were there to admire? Katherine? She’s nice enough, but a little too good for my tastes; she verges on dull. I don’t understand Jorg’s obsession with her, nor the point Jorg’s obsession plays in the story–it adds nothing but a poor attempt at a non-conventional love plot. And Chella, who is somewhat interesting, particularly as some of the chapters in this book are from her point of view. Seeing more of her back story and motivation was key in actually developing her character. I can’t help but wonder what happened to her, at the very end there, after… Shh, spoilers.

And Jorg’s brothers, well. Nothing much changes there. Makin remains my favourite, painted that perfect shade of grey. Rike comes full circle, and to end on absent-minded plundering and a last minute turn around in character was a pretty perfect conclusion for him. Gorgoth was, for all he is a troll, the most human of them all. There isn’t a single of his road brothers that i don’t love the relationship Jorg has with them.

The plot… it meandered a bit. Stories with a lot of travelling do tend to have that issue. It started strong, with action and intrigue. And some of the flashback narratives kept things interesting. But after a certain point, things petered out and i was left waiting for things to pick up again. Which they didn’t until the climax. And in comparison to the previous book, which was non-stop action–an entire battle told over the course of the book– this book doesn’t hold up, unfortunately.

It didn’t have to keep up the action, though. I did thoroughly enjoy this book, and all of miscreant Jorg’s adventures in death, revenge and power. I’m really looking forward to getting hold of Prince of Fools, finding out even more about this world, these places and meeting new characters–of which there had better be more, and more awesome, females. The glimpse we had of the Red Queen was enough to get me interested…

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TTT: If You Like Horror

TTTThis week has been the first topic in a good long while that has actually appealed to me. However, that didn’t make it easy. In fact, this was pretty difficult. I don’t think I read enough “super popular books” to have a base to recommend from. Nor do read enough in any genre to really have enough books to recommend. Well, with the exception of maybe one…

Lo, I present to you my top ten books to read if you like “super popular author” Stephen King, or the horror genre in general. There is a range of horror represented here, but all kinds of horror Stephen King has dabbled in (because really, what type of horror hasn’t he dabbled in?)

The Haunting of Hill House – A classic haunted house horror story with a psychological twist. This is possibly my very favourite horror novel, ever.

Haunted – Erring on the graphic line of the horror genre, but being no less creepy for it.

I Am Legend – Science fiction meets creature feature. The true horror in this book is its tense psychological terror.

Apartment 16 – Very reminiscent of Stephen King, generally. Demons and ghosts and creepy happening in this flat.

Prince of Thorns – A true horror in that this book deals with violent murder, rape and war in a post-apocalyptic Middle Age-like setting.

Pandaemonium – More of a horror comedy, i’m sure Christopher Brookmyre doesn’t know how to make his readers not laugh, even in the midst of, well, pandemonium.

The Midwich Cuckoos – Everyone in a small town falls asleep, during which time all the women become pregnant. Creepy horror at its very best.

Tiny Deaths – This as a book of short stories, all written around the theme of death. Some are more horrifying than others, but what’s more horrifying than facing your own mortality?

Party Monster – Is outrageous horror a thing? This book makes it a thing. Sex, drugs, murder and dismemberment with the Club Kids!

Florence and Giles – Starting off as a quiet and unassuming creepy house horror, this book evolves into something supernatural before dealing an altogether different twist.

King of Thorns

kotTitle: King of Thorns

Author: Mark Lawrence

Summary: To reach greatness you must step on bodies. I’ll win this game of ours, though the cost of it may drown the world in blood…

A six nation army marches toward Jorg’s gates, led by a shining hero determined to unite the empire and heal its wounds. Every omen says he will. Every good king knows to bend the knee in the face of overwhelming odds, if only to save their people and their lands. But King Jorg is not a good king.

Faced by an enemy many times his strength, Jorg knows that he cannot win a fair fight. But playing fair was never part of Jorg’s game plan…

Rating: ★★★★☆ 4/5

Review: I read the first book in the Broken Empire series, Prince of Thorns, a year an a half ago. And i felt that long stretch of time while reading this sequel, because there were so many details i couldn’t remember. Thankfully, as the increased rating will attest, this did not hamper my enjoyment of the book.

I think i enjoyed this book more than the first, but it bothers me that, because i don’t remember the first well enough, i can’t say for certain why. Ultimately, i finished this book with a strong desire to re-read the first! If i had to guess why i liked this book more without the re-read, i would say it was possibly the fact that i already knew the characters. As well as that, we get to know these characters in a little more depth in this book. And really, because the book is told in first person from Jorg’s point of view again, we’re essentially seeing Jorg get to know these characters–and that includes himself.

Makin is still my favourite, i think. He is that perfect balance between a likeable character–a “good” man–and having an edge about him, being loyal to the ruthless, amoral Jorg. Makin is like the angel on one of Jorg’s shoulders, but he is a realist; he doesn’t try to stop Jorg or make him a better person, only watch his back, make Jorg sure of himself and his plans.

Of the other brothers, none stand out–they all add their own flavour to Jorg’s band of characters and i enjoy them all. I do love the banter and hate-hate but smidgen of almost-respect and mutual benefit relationship between Jorg and Rike, though. For such horrible characters, i do find myself far too fond of them all.

The best new character, hands down, was Miana. At 12 she is immediately an intellectual and determined match for Jorg, instantly earning enough of Jorg’s respect to make her worth something to him. And then later, well, she’s more than a match for Jorg in my opinion and i hope like hell she’s in the third book.

The plot, well, in essence the plot is a simple one: war. Jorg defending his hard-won land. But it’s the twists and turns of how he does it, and the flashback journey he took four years earlier that started it all off, that make the narrative more interesting. And there are plenty of twists and turns. The whole book is a trickle of plot points, small reveals and interest-peaking information. It’s in the last third of the book that the bigger revelations, dramatic action and (hopefully!) set up for the next book happen.

What i loved most about this book, though, was the writing. It is witty and subtle and clever and so, so quotable. The books deals with the heavy topics of murder, rape, war, genocide and more… but manages to keep the tone light, while not making light of the subjects. It’s, well, pretty damn perfect, actually. I think i overlooked that in my reading of the first book, or it slipped by me when i wasn’t looking. But Mark Lawrence can really bloody write.

And still, the most intriguing and interesting thing for me is the post-apocalyptic setting. There are many more glimpses and hints and experiences of it in this book, and seeing them from the point of view of people a thousand years later is fascinating, and something i have never seen before. This mix of 21st century, Middle Ages and fantasy (fantasy with a realistic, science fiction edge, which i love so hard) is something i feel i could nerd about for a long, long time. I will save it, though.

I will certainly not be leaving it a year and a half until reading the third and final book in the series. There are just so many things i enjoy smushed together into these books, and what Mark Lawrence has done with them is damn good.

This knocks one square off my Bookish Bingo: Second book in a series.

Prince of Thorns

PoTTitle: Prince of Thorns

Author: Mark Lawrence

Summary: From being a privileged royal child, raised by a loving mother, Jorg Ancrath has become the Prince of Thorns, a charming, immoral boy leading a grim band of outlaws in a series of raids and atrocities. The world is in chaos: violence is rife, nightmares everywhere. Jorg has the ability to master the living and the dead, but there is still one thing that putsa chill in him. Returning to his father’s castle, Jorg must confront horrors from his childhood and carve himself a future with all hands turned against him.

Rating: ★★★☆☆ 3/5

Review: I decided i wanted to read this book over a year ago, but when i picked it up to start reading it last week, i couldn’t remember why. I thought (and now know) it was because of the post-apocalyptic setting, however one or two goodreads reviews left me extremely nervous about starting to read it.

I have now learnt my lesson about how much faith to place in random goodreads reviews; they were highly over dramatic and unfair, and in one case, the reviewer hadn’t even read more than the first few pages.

Yes, there are some nasty things in this book. Yes, the main character, Jorg, is not a pleasant person. No, they are not reasons to dismiss this book or (necessarily) not enjoy it.

There is plenty of action and plot, mostly consisting of fighting, murder, death and destruction with a bit of family drama and testing of friendships. But what this book mostly seems to be is a character study of Jorg, and i’m okay with that.

The blurb describes Jorg and immoral, but I can’t decide if he’s immoral or amoral. In truth i think he is a little of both. He recognises that others may call him evil and think what he does immoral, but he himself has no problem with it–he has no morals. Except that, in some cases, he does. Jorg considers doing and does do things he, personally, does not find appealing, because he believes they should be done. He hurts people he cares about and does not enjoy it.

Prince of Thorns is told in first person, and that’s perfect for getting inside Jorg’s head. Except is everything he thinks his own thoughts? Even he isn’t sure. Which just makes him an even more fascinating character, as far as i’m concerned.

Jorg was not my favourite character, though, not by far. The Nuban and Makin share the top spot. They had more depth (and more mystery, since we don’t actually find out that much about them), while still have enough of the ambiguous morality for me to appreciate them. Also loyalty. They didn’t always agree with Jorg, but they respected him and, equally, he always respected them–it was them it pained him to hurt.

The post-apocalyptic setting was too subtle for me. It was excellent, and realistic, really, i am just fascinated by the idea and crave more information. Over a thousand years after a nuclear war and the surviving humans (and mutants) have worked their way up to something resembling the middle ages. There are only hints at what happened and what’s left behind. Their ‘castles’ are the foundations of long-destroyed skyscrapers, Jorg quotes Nietzsche and the swearing is crude and straightforward. Of course the best bit was when they… with the… but i won’t spoil it.

There are two more book in this series, and i think i will, at some point, give the second one a go. If for nothing else than to glimpse more of this intriguing post-apocalyptic setting and follow Jorg in his unhurried but determined ambitions and craving for revenge.

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