Women of Wonder

Title: Women of Wonder

Author: Various

Summary: In Women of Wonder, Pamela Sargent has assembled a collection of amazing stories which show that some of the most exciting and innovative writing in science fiction is being produced by women.

That Only a Mother (1948) story by Judith Merril
Contagion (1950) novelette by Katherine MacLean
The Wind People (1959) story by Marion Zimmer Bradley
The Ship Who Sang (1961) novelette by Anne McCaffrey
When I Was Miss Dow (1966) story by Sonya Dorman
The Food Farm (1967) story by Kit Reed
Baby, You Were Great (1967) story by Kate Wilhelm
Sex &/or Mr. Morrison (1967) story by Carol Emshwiller
Vaster Than Empires & More Slow (1971) novelette by Ursula K. Le Guin
False Dawn (1972) story by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro
Nobody’s Home (1972) story by Joanna Russ
Of Mist, & Grass, & Sand (1973) novelette by Vonda N. McIntyre

Rating: ★★★★☆ 4/5

Review: I found out about this book when i was gifted the Penguin Science Fiction Postcards collection. A quick google later and I discovered there were several books in this series–all science fiction short stories by women. I am into every single aspect of that with a passion, and it wasn’t long later that I had sourced the entire series of books secondhand online and had them in my possession. So now, I’m working my way through them!

I’ll be honest… I skipped the introduction. It might have been brilliant and I could have loved it, but i wanted at these stories. If it had been written by Le Guin I’d have been all over that; I could read her non-fiction analysis essays all. Damn. Day. But whatever, i went straight for the heart of this book: the short stories.

Each chapter had a little introduction to the author and a short synopsis of the story. This was nice, giving some context and setting the scene for each story. It also helps now, when I’m skipping backwards and forwards through the book to write about the stories, to jog my memory about which is which. (I’m crap with names and titles!)

Let’s start with my favourites. Plural, because there were a few strong ones here.

The Ship Who Sang was one of the first to really stand out for me. I got the novel in my December 2016 Prudence of the Crow vintage book subscription box, but of course, have not yet read it. So it was wonderful to read this short story version, however it has only left me wanting to dive into the full novel, to fully meet these characters and get utterly emotionally invested.

Baby You Were Great was that perfect balance of fascinating new-tech sci-fi and creepy fucked up sci-fi. The idea that everything you see and even feel can be recorded for other people to experience, and how that can be exploited and manipulated. Lots to digest and unpack here, and that’s how I love my science fiction!

Of course, Le Guin. Vaster Than Empires & More Slow was truly a mini-novel, it packed in so much. I could barely keep track of the characters (again, i’m bad with names, okay?), but there were only a few that really mattered here. Exploring the concept of empathy, how it can shape relationships, and how knowing how others are feeling can actually be very isolating.

In a much more subtle, understated way, I also really loved Nobody’s Home. In a world where instantaneous travel exists, this story speculates how that might affect love and family and friendships, in such an open and lovely way. It also touches on genetic engineering and the value placed on intelligence–higher and higher.

There were a few stories I was really drawn into, but ultimately let down by, too.

The one I have the strongest feelings about is False Dawn. Set in a polluted dystopia this story was at first really interesting, following a mutant woman with archery skills who was being hunted by pirates. I was all in on this narrative… until it took a terrible turn, leaving our main character defenseless, mutilated, raped, and suddenly falling in love with the random bloke who rescues her. Erm… no, thank you.

Of Mist, and Grass, and Sand was another story that was very compelling, but that didn’t quite do enough for me. Supposedly set in a post-technological word, there was nothing that struck me as obviously post-tech–it could just have easily been pre-tech, or non-existent-tech, or irrelevant-tech. I didn’t connect enough with the main character. She seemed interesting, but was a little too aloof and mysterious… so much so that I didn’t care enough about her.

There were also several decent three-star stories in here. Contagion, The Wind People, and Sex and/or Mr Morrison all sparked my interest and fascination in one way or another.

Overall I really enjoyed this book, and reading stories written by and specifically about women. I will always need more feminist science fiction in my life, and I can’t wait to read more in this series.

Milk and Honey

Title: Milk and Honey

Author: Rupi Kaur

Summary: this is the journey of
surviving through poetry
this is the blood sweat tears
of twenty-one years
this is my heart
this is my hands
this is
the hurting
the loving
the breaking
the healing

Rating: ★★★★★ 5/5

Review: I’ve had this book on my self for a while. I’d read a few of the short poems within it, and one in particular that I adore… but still I’ve hesitated to pick it up and fully dive in. I’ve been afraid, as poetry and I have a tumultuous relationship.

I want to love poetry, but i’m not sure it wants me to. A lot of the time, I just don’t get it. But this… this is poetry I get and poetry I love.

The poems are mostly short, two or four lines, but sum up so eloquently the emotions and importance of things that might so easily go overlooked. Love, lust, a kiss, self-love (both kinds), anger, heartbreak, pain, healing… it’s all here and more.

And it is more. Kaur has put words to specific feelings and fears that I hadn’t been able to pinpoint or articulate before. Not every poem resonated with me, but those that did hit hard. I’ve re-read several dozens of times now, and a couple even left me in tears.

These poems show a woman who is in touch with herself, her experiences, and her words. I envy that intensely, but am so glad I get to share Kaur’s words. I’m glad to have her put voice to some of my own emotions and feel calm in the knowledge that I’m not alone in them.

Kaur’s illustrations, as simple and effective as her words, add so much to the poems as well. Line drawings of women, hands, objects, nature… They are a striking accompaniment to the poems, providing emphasis, insight, and a reason to pause—to breathe—between pieces.

I will certainly be picking up Kaur’s second book at the earliest opportunity. I’ve never experienced poetry speaking to me so clearly and meaningfully before, and I look forward to experiencing that again. And again, and again, and…

i am water
soft enough
to offer life
tough enough
to drown it away

you have sadness
living in places
sadness shouldn’t live

i do not want to have you
to fill the empty parts of me
i want to be full on my own
i want to be so complete
i could light a whole city
and then
i want to have you
cause the two of us combined
could set it on fire

you
are your own
soul mate

Face

Title: Face

Author: Rosario Villajos

Summary: Face is a magical autobiography about identity, the escape of oneself towards love and the fight to fit in and be “normal” in our society.

Rating: ★★★☆☆ 3.5/5

Review: The cover of this book, and the short blurb on the back, caught my attention very quickly. I couldn’t help but pick it up at my local comic book shop and bring it home. And like most random purchases of this manner, it did not disappoint.

The premise is simple enough: the book is about a young woman with no face. It follows her as she struggles to build relationships and explores how she feels that she doesn’t fit in with everyone else. Sound familiar? It should. I’m sure everyone has gone through similar struggles. Because the concept isn’t about looks–it’s about identity. Face (as the character is known) studies the faces of the people around her and tries to emulate them, she begins a relationship and finds herself becoming them. She looks to external sources to find herself, with poor results.

It was the end of the book that stood out for me, when she begins to notice just how many other people around her also have no faces–as also struggling with their own identity and place in the world. That we’re all just stumbling through life trying to figure things out.

The art work is mostly black and white, with colour used rarely, but to good effect. The style of the art changes throughout, too. The general panels are fairly simply, while the portraits of people the character takes note of and are important to her are rendered with such careful precision. It all blends and works beautifully together, giving so much life and texture to the pages and the story.

My favourite pages were the chapter markers–1, 2, and 3. Their simplicity, but careful detail were stunning, and how they capture the essence of each chapter is perfect. I particularly love the heart of chapter one. That’s frame-worthy.

Three

Title: Three

Author: Annemarie Monahan

Summary: One yellow April morning, a 17-year-old girl asks herself, “Do I dare to eat a peach?” What she decides will send her life in one of three directions.

That morning is long past. Now she is 41.

On one life path, she is Kitty. She’s been happily married for 23 years. Happily enough. Until Faye, her professor, kisses her.

On another path, she is Katherine, a physician. After the death of an old love, she contacts the one lover who still haunts her: a woman who renounced her for God.

On a third, she calls herself Antonia. She’s barely survived the implosion of a lesbian utopian commune, one built on an abandoned oil rig.

Who are we? Who haven’t we been? Have we dared? Three of one woman’s possible lives are about to collide.

Rating: ★★★★★ 5/5

Review: I can’t remember when, where, or how i came across this book, but i’m so glad i did, because i loved it. I was immediately sucked in, instantly fascinated by these three women in their opening chapters and ready to read more.

The chapters alternate between the three women and their lives, sharing their pasts and presents. As different as they all are, there are traits they all share. For example, they are all very observant: Katherine as a doctor, noting symptoms and concerns to easily diagnose the ailment and the patient’s motivations; Kitty as an expert shopper, getting the best bargains and stocking piling while she can; and Antonia as a clairvoyant on a psychic telephone hotline, using her ability to read people so well even over the phone to rack up the longest call times and the biggest pay cheques. I loved all three of them, in their own ways. I was never disappointed when one character’s chapter ended, only happy to dive right into the next.

Although all, originally, the same woman, that peach took them each on different journeys. And despite the fact it is relationships and love that each of them are struggling with in their stories, they are all exploring different aspects of that. Antonia wants to help save the woman she loves from herself as well as a group of well-meaning but self-destructive earth child hippies, but at the expense of herself. Katherine is contemplating lost love, things left unsaid, and the different experiences people have of the same events. Kitty is finally allowing herself to wake up and explore aspects of her own desire she has kept so well-hidden. There is something here everyone should be able to relate to.

The writing is wonderful. It is clever and witty and poetic and meaningful–and i’m still not sure how it manages to be all those things at once, but it does. And it reads so effortlessly that it was simply a joy to pick up. This was a book i didn’t want to put down, but it was also a book i was enjoying enough to want to make it last. I think i managed quite well, finishing at a sedate pace of 10 days. But i still want to be reading it now.

The only place the book faltered was in the final few short chapters, when each woman’s story was, in a manner of speaking, ‘wrapped up’. At this point the writing became overly poetic and lost some of its meaning; it veered from the story and the point a little in an attempt to be sincere and significant, but succeeded only in being vague and inconsequential.

As far as i’m aware this is the only book by Monahan, but it want more of her words. They were, on the whole, perfection.

The Power

Title: The Power

Author: Naomi Alderman

Summary: All over the world women are discovering they have the power. With a flick of their fingers they can inflict terrible pain – even death.

Suddenly, every man on the planet finds they’ve lost control. The day of the girls has arrived – but where will it end?

Rating: ★★★★☆ 3.5/5

Review: I’ll admit, my expectations were easily and unnaturally high for this one. I loved the premise, and i’d heard so many–so many, maybe that should have given me pause–good things about this book. In hindsight, it was never going to live up to that.

It started strong. I loved all the characters, their individual stories and the way they were spread across the world was interesting, and i was intrigued as to how their paths would cross. Roxy was my favourite, and it was her introduction that revved me up and excited me for what was to come. She had the drive and the circumstances to be powerful with or without “The Power” and that’s what i loved about her. Margot i liked for her cunning and manipulation. Like Roxy, she would have got just as far without “The Power”, but it changed the game she was playing and i loved seeing the moves she made. Allie i liked a lot at the start, but when she became Mother Eve she became less interesting to me. Tunde i found likable throughout. His ambition and motivation seemed limitless, even when his life started to get difficult.

I loved that start of the book. Seeing girls developing “The Power”, passing it to the older generations, and how society reacted and adapted to that. Small almost unnoticeable things at first, before the larger tables began to turn. It was the smaller details and side stories that really worked for me. The chat show host who went from amenable female sidekick to the lead with a compliant male sidekick of her own. Roxy’s brother who is sexually assaulted and forever damaged by the events. The middled-aged women kept captive by men who fight for their freedom after a young girl awakes “The Power” in them. And most especially the letters between the author and pre-reader which frame the book–the subtle ways it illustrates the way men and women treat and are treated differently. I loved those bits.

The overall story didn’t do much for me. It felt like it was trying to be widespread and world-effecting, but seemed very focused in only a small number of places. I felt it jumped quickly from demonstrating the gradual changes in the US to all out war in eastern Europe, and when the focus did shift, we left almost all of the US development behind. When Margot’s voice was lost from the narrative, i found myself loosing my interest as well. As much as i appreciate why Mother Eve and the religious aspects of the story were included and what role they play, that side of the narrative also failed to thrill me.

By the end of the book the story and the writing felt a little haphazard and messy. After such a build up, the end–though fitting and satisfying–came rather swiftly. Narration began switching randomly between characters during the same chapters, despite being clearly delineated throughout the rest of the book. As much as I had some issues with the story overall, it was well organised and plotted until the last 50 pages, where things began to rush along in a tangled mess towards the finish line.

Although i loved the general idea, the characters, and the details and side stories, I found the book as a whole lacked focus and a clear narrative. I think the world created here is brilliant–and i would love a book of short stories set between the emergence of “The Power” and, well, the end of the book. The book itself, though, seems to be telling such a big story, over so many years, that the nuances needed within that story aren’t there.

TTT: Feminist Recommendations

With an open prompt this week of “recommendations for _________” I had a few ideas, but in the end I’ve decided to recommend a bunch of books for feminists, because I think a lot, if not all, of these books should be required reading for everyone—man, woman, child, and everyone in between.

I haven’t read all of these (yet!), but they all have important messages, whether straight up in essay form, or through a fictional narrative. I lovelovelove all the books here I have read, and can’t wait to get started on the ones I haven’t.

If you have any feminist book recommendations, leave them for me in the comments—i want MORE!

We Should All Be Feminists: A personal and powerful essay from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the bestselling author of ‘Americanah’ and ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’, based on her 2013 TEDx Talk of the same name.

Sisters of the Revolution: This book gathers a highly curated selection of feminist speculative fiction (science fiction, fantasy, horror and more) chosen by one of the most respected editorial teams in speculative literature today.

A Room of One’s Own: Why is it, Woolf asks, that men have always had power, influence, wealth, and fame, while women have had nothing but children? There will be female Shakespeares in the future, Woolf argues, only if women are provided with two basics of freedom: a fixed income of 500 per year and a room of one’s own in which to write.

The Female Man: When these four women meet, the results are startling, outrageous, and subversive.

Bad Feminist: A collection of essays spanning politics, criticism, and feminism from one of the most-watched young cultural observers of her generation.

The Handmaid’s Tale: In Gilead, where women are prohibited from holding jobs, reading, and forming friendships, Offred’s persistent memories of life in the ‘time before’ and her will to survive are acts of rebellion.

The Power: Suddenly – tomorrow or the day after – teenage girls find that with a flick of their fingers, they can inflict agonizing pain and even death.

Herland: A story about three male explorers who stumble upon an all-female society isolated somewhere in South America. Noting the advanced state of the civilization they’ve encountered, the visitors set out to find some males, assuming that since the country is so civilized, “there must be men.”

The Trouble with Women: Can women be geniuses? Or are their arms too short? Why did we only learn about two three women at school? What were all the others doing?

Revolutionary Women: A Book of Stencils: A Feminist Speculative Fiction Anthology: Both a radical feminist history and a street art resource, this handbook combines short biographies with striking and usable stencil images of 30 female activists, anarchists, feminists, freedom fighters, and visionaries.

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We Should All Be Feminists

wsabfTitle: We Should All Be Feminists

Author: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Summary: ‘I would like to ask that we begin to dream about and plan for a different world. A fairer world. A world of happier men and happier women who are truer to themselves. And this is how to start: we must raise our daughters differently. We must also raise our sons differently…’

Rating: ★★★★★ 5/5

Review: At 50-odd smaller than average sized pages, this is a quick read. It’s also an excellent read. It should be a compulsory read.

Whether you’re a woman who has experienced sexism every day of her life, whether you’re a man who recognises the inequality of the sexes, whether you already call yourself a feminist–you will still gain something for reading this. Of course, the people who really need to read it are none of the above.

Adichie has such a straightforward, easy writing style. Not a single word is wasted or superfluous, and even in print she comes across as so calm and patient. Calm is definitely something i find it hard to remain when talking about sexism and women’s rights. But i think that calmness helps her make her arguments, helps get her point across without sounding challenging or immediately prompting a defence. (And having now heard some of her TEDx talk she based the book on–yes, her delivery is perfect and comes across just as well in writing.)

For so few words the book covers so much, starting from childhood, adolescence, relationships, adulthood, socialising, and work. I’ve lived with some of these things all my life, but some i hadn’t considered in great detail, or hadn’t experienced to such an extent. To have things put so plainly really makes you stop and take them in.

Most importantly, i think, reading it didn’t make me angry. I didn’t feel mad at the world, for all its injustices and prejudice and sexist culture. Becoming fired up and ready to fight is the norm for me when discussing these issues. But Adichie’s words and her calmness in laying them out only calmed me in turn. It made me feel less isolated, knowing there are women going through the same things i am, fighting the same fights. And it also gave me hope that it can be talked about, recognised and fought on a broader level.

I want to buy a dozen copies and leave them about at the bus stop, in cafes, on desks. It’s so small and seems so innocuous, that i think people might actually pick it up. Even if they just flick through it and read a page or two, it would offer them something, a thought or perspective they hadn’t considered before. It might make them think and look around them, it might make them see and act.

The Yellow Wallpaper

tywTitle: The Yellow Wallpaper

Author: Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Summary: Best known for the 1892 title story of this collection, a harrowing tale of a woman’s descent into madness. Charlotte Perkins Gilman wrote more than 200 other short stories. Seven of her finest are reprinted here.

Written from a feminist perspective, often focusing on the inferior status accorded to women by society, these charming tales are not only highly readable and full of humour and invention, but also offer ample food for thought about the social, economic, and personal relationships of men and women–and how they might be improved.

Rating: ★★★★☆ 4/5

Review: I read and adored Gilman’s Herland a few years ago. I did, and still do, think that is a book that should be compulsory reading for everyone. However, after finishing The Yellow Wallpaper and the other short stories contained in this book, i think everyone should read this book first.

The stories are short, easy to read and, on the face of it, easy to digest. Their message–the point Gilman is trying to make in each story–is quite clear, and well told. She has a talent for making her point–for clearly portraying inequality and sexism–without ever making it about us verses them; without outright blaming or alienating men. Really, more men should read her work. And by ‘more’ i mean ‘all’.

My favourite story was by far ‘If I Were A Man’, where a wife inhabits her husband’s mind and body, with both her own and his memories and thoughts. She/he is able to evaluate the mindset of both sexes, and make a small move to bring them to more of an understanding.

The title story, The Yellow Wallpaper, was another excellent story. It felt very much biographical; some how striking a more personal–more real–chord than the other stories. Delving into her psyche and mental health, which are so easy dismissed and overlooked by the males around her. I think this is both a reflection of the time period’s (lack of) understanding of mental health and a comment on sexism. I think both of these are issues that are still rife today, and still desperately need to be talked about more.

My only real qualm with this book is the fact that, by the very nature of short stories, the concepts and issues broached are not delved into deeply enough. They are a light, quick and skimmed view of feminist issues–which is the very reason i think this book would be perfect for people to read before Herland. These stories would plant the seeds that Herland could then help grow.

With Gilman’s bibliography being as long as it is, i feel a strong need to get my hands on some more of her work!

This knocks one square off my Bookish Bingo: A colour in the title.

The Female Man

tfmTitle: The Female Man

Author: Joanna Russ

Summary: Joanna’s world is recognisable; it’s very much like ours. So is Jeannine’s–except that in hers the Second World War never happened, the Great Depression is still going on, and inequality is even more rampant.

But Janet’s world is different. On the planet Whileaway there is no problem of relations between the sexes because there is only one. Janet is unfettered, she is free to lead her life as she wants, as an able and competent being, as a female man.

Rating: ★★★★☆ 3.5/5

Review: There are two things i need to explain in this review. What i loved about this book, and why it took me a month to read it. It was a random purchase from a library book sale, and i was instantly intrigued and eager to read it. Science fiction and gender? Yes, yes please.

On the gender front, this book is brilliant, and the science fiction aspect only helps explore things. It brings together four versions of the same woman (the author, Joanna Russ, essentially), from alternate realities and times. One from a 1930s version of the present day, one from a time unspecified but which represents the author’s and readers own time, one from the female-only world of Whileaway, and lastly one from a world which is engaged in a literal war of the sexes. Their views on their worlds and their own identity and behaviour differ wildly, but still they stick together, travelling and learning.

Honestly, i wished i’d read the book with a pencil in hand to mark the lines and passages that struck me as right, as making the best point, as putting the perfect words to things i have felt and experienced all my life. There were so, so many. There was one particular chapter that spanned several pages, and i just want to type it out, word for word, and make the world read it. I’ll have to settle for quoting here the line that summed up a lot of it so succinctly for me:

For years I have been saying Let me in, Love me, Approve me, Define me, Regulate me, Validate me, Support me. Now I say Move over.

Urgh, this book just makes my heart feel more alive, feel a glimmer of hope, feel like it’s not just me; it’s all women, in all walks of life, in all sorts of ways. It makes me feel understood and not alone. Jael, in particular, also made me feel fucking empowered. And the very end, damn. That very last paragraph. This book will stay with me for a long time.

And so, why only 3.5/5? Why did it take me so long to read? Because as a work of fiction, as a story… it fell so flat. I think this book would work so much better as a series of essays, because that is already what it reads like, on the whole, to me. The thing the story lacked was a strong narrative and any kind of drive, which in turn left me with no drive to keep reading, to keep picking up the book. I had no desire to know what happened next, because nothing was happening. It felt a lot like free writing at times, like character studies at others, and often it was not clear who was narrating. Some sections are written in first person, but it’s not easy to distinguish whose, which took my mind away from the story and the meaning, and i began to focus on details and technicalities.

I enjoyed the book immensely when i was reading it, but found it so hard to pick up again when i wasn’t. I enjoyed each section and the individual messages being conveyed, but the story they were supposed to fit around just seemed non-existent. I would have liked more structure to the chapters and individual stories told throughout the book, so they each existed in their own terms, rather than in and around a narrative that failed to make the most of itself around them.

Despite the haphazard structure and lacking narrative, there was so much to love about this book, and i will be seeking out more of Russ’ feminist science fiction works. I hope more of it weaves the two together more seamlessly into a worthy story, without compromising on the amazing feminist literary criticism. Some might argue that this book is outdated, but i wonder which world they are living in, because it’s not one of the ones represented in this book.

This knocks two squares off my Bookish Bingo: LGBT main character and a main character my age.

The Knitting Circle Rapist Annihilation Squad

knitTitle: The Knitting Circle Rapist Annihilation Squad

Author: Derrick Jensen & Stephanie McMillan

Summary: The six women of the Knitting Circle meet every week to talk, eat cake, and make fabulous sweaters. Until the night they realise they are all the survivors of rape—and that not one of their assailants has suffered a single consequence. Enough is enough! The knitting circles becomes the Knitting Circle Rapist Annihilation Squad. They declare open season on rapists, with no licenses and no bag limits. With needles as their weapons, the revolution begins!

Rating: ★★★☆☆ 3/5

Review: I think my expectations were too high for this one. I knew of some of Derrick Jensen’s non-fiction books, and his general political leaning. So a book by him about a group of women forming the Knitting Circle Rapist Annihilation Squad had to be amazing, right? Not so right.

Let’s start generally. Generally, this book reads like it’s written for 9-13 year olds. At several points i considered giving this book to my 9-year-old niece, the only thing that stopped me was the fact that she wouldn’t understand a lot of the references. Generally, the humour is trying too hard. It’s past funny and into cringe-worthy slapstick territory. It’s not clever humour, it’s not even well done humour, it’s loud and poorly written humour. Generally, none of the characters were well-developed or likeable. They weren’t hateable, either, they were just two dimensional and there to serve an obvious point. Generally, the plot progression was ridiculous. Nothing was believable. Maybe i was being to logical and rational in a book that had neither of those things, but i’d like a story about the eradication of rape to be somewhat based in reality.

More specifically, i like that the book broaches important topics that are not often discussed in day-to-day life. Rape, exploitation of women, women’s rights, media influence, police brutality, how fucked up politics is, religion, extremist groups and more. It broached these topics, but it did not discuss them. Instead, it tried to use humour and over the top caricatures to make their opinion of these things clear. Key word in that last sentence: tried. Rather than making their opinions clear, they shoved them into the reader’s face, while using such awful humour, i’m sure anyone who didn’t share the opinions would laugh it all off as a bad joke.

Ultimately, that’s my problem. That this book isn’t doing anything. It could have provided readers with an opportunity to think about things, things they might not have considered before, because they are told by the world that those things are normal. It could have helped a lot of people start to think about their life and the world around them a little more. Instead, it’s a poorly written book of bad humour. Wavering close to offending me, and allowing others to laugh at what they should be thinking about.

Purely on quality, this book is really only worth two stars, but i felt obligated to throw on an extra, because it is at least trying to write about subjects that should be written about–read about–more. But really, it’s a book about rape. I think this book could have been so much more well written, and with witty, intelligent humour. I think this book could have been written with a lot more respect.